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Descendants of Geoffrey Sir D'Aubigne

Generation No. 1

1. GEOFFREY SIR1 D'AUBIGNE was born 1160.

 

Child of GEOFFREY SIR D'AUBIGNE is:

2. i. JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1201.

 

Generation No. 2

2. JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2 D'AUBIGNE (GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1201.

 

Child of JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER D'AUBIGNE is:

3. i. D'AIMERY3 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1231.

 

Generation No. 3

3. D'AIMERY3 D'AUBIGNE (JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1231. He married JEANNE DE BAUPEAU.

 

Child of D'AIMERY D'AUBIGNE and JEANNE DE BAUPEAU is:

4. i. GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1273, Aubigne, Anjou, France.

 

Generation No. 4

4. GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4 D'AUBIGNE (D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1273 in Aubigne, Anjou, France. He married ALIENOR DECOEME.

 

Child of GUILLAUME D'AUBIGNE and ALIENOR DECOEME is:

5. i. SUVORY "GAVARY"5 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1329.

 

Generation No. 5

5. SUVORY "GAVARY"5 D'AUBIGNE (GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1329. He married HONNEUR DELAHAVE PASSANT (PASS A VENT).

 

Child of SUVORY D'AUBIGNE and HONNEUR PASSANT (PASS A VENT) is:

6. i. PIERRE6 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1374.

 

Generation No. 6

6. PIERRE6 D'AUBIGNE (SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1374. He married JEANNE DE L'EPINE.

 

Child of PIERRE D'AUBIGNE and JEANNE DE L'EPINE is:

7. i. MERLET7 D'AUBIGNE.

 

Generation No. 7

7. MERLET7 D'AUBIGNE (PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1). He married MARGUERRITE GASSELINE, daughter of WILLIAM GASSELINE.

 

Child of MERLET D'AUBIGNE and MARGUERRITE GASSELINE is:

8. i. THEBART8 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1450.

 

Generation No. 8

8. THEBART8 D'AUBIGNE (MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1450. He married JEANNE DE LA PARNIERE.

 

Child of THEBART D'AUBIGNE and JEANNE DE LA PARNIERE is:

9. i. PIERRE9 D'AUBIGNE.

 

Generation No. 9

9. PIERRE9 D'AUBIGNE (THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1). He married CATHERINE DE CHOURSES.

 

Child of PIERRE D'AUBIGNE and CATHERINE DE CHOURSES is:

10. i. JEAN10 D'AUBIGNE SEIGNEUR DE BRIE, b. 1520; d. 1563, in Siege of Orlbbans, France.

 

Generation No. 10

10. JEAN10 D'AUBIGNE SEIGNEUR DE BRIE (PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born 1520, and died 1563 in in Siege of Orlbbans, France1. He married CATHERINE DE L'ESTANG.

 

Child of JEAN D'AUBIGNE and CATHERINE DE L'ESTANG is:

11. i. THEODORE AGRIPPA11 D'AUBIGNE, b. February 09, 1551/52, Near Paris, France; d. April 29, 1630, Geneva Switzerland.

 

Generation No. 11

11. THEODORE AGRIPPA11 D'AUBIGNE (JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1)2 was born February 09, 1551/52 in Near Paris, France3, and died April 29, 1630 in Geneva Switzerland4. He married SUZANNE DE LUSIGNON5 1583 in France6, daughter of ABROIS DE LUSIGNON and RENEE DE VEVOUNE.

Notes for THEODORE AGRIPPA D'AUBIGNE:

They say that one must cast unspeakable things Into thepitofforgetfulness, into seale d t o m bs, That by the written word,evil,raisedup again, Will infect the customs of later ge n e rat ions;Butknowledge isnot the mother of evil, And virtue is not the daughterofignora n c e.Ba udelaire, from the Tragiques of Agrippa d'Aubigne

 

1 AUTH Huguenot captain "master of the Horse" for Henry of Navarre

Domain: Literature. Status: Major

Poet, Soldier, Scholar, Novelist, Autobiographer

Active 1615 - 1630 in France, Continental Europe

The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001.

Aubignbb, Thbbodore Agrippa d

 

(tdbprp grppp dbnyp). , 15521630, French poet and Huguenotsoldier.Adevoted follower o f H e n ry of Navarre (Henry IV) from 1568, hewaslaterassociated with Henri de Rohan in an ab ort i v e plot and fledFrancetolive in Geneva (1620). His Histoire universelle (161618) is a n ac countof the French religious wars from 1553 to 1602.DAubignbbsreputationrests on Les T r a g iques (1616), an epic poem usingapocalypticallegoryto condemn the wars. Rediscovere d a n d c elebrated bytheRomanticsbecause of its somber imagery, Les Tragiques is now recogni ze da s one ofthe French Baroque masterpieces.

Theodore Agrippa d'Aubigne (1552-1630), a soldier, historianandpoet,Calvinistic, whos e l i f e, filled with dangers and adventuresintheHuguenot cause under Henri IV, ended in ex i l e a t Geneva and diedahero.He is remembered for his Histoire Universelle and Histoire Sec r e tewhowere officially burned and he also wrote Les Aventures dubarondeFoeneste and Le s T r a giques, poemes satiriques

http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/s/s848fs/chap9.html

CHAPTER IX JOHN KNOX AND HIS RELATIONS TO WOMEN

I. THE CONTROVERSY ABOUT FEMALE RULE.

Thus, too, we have Theodore Agrippa dAubigne writing to hisdaughtersaboutthe learned w o m e n of his century, and cautioning them,inconclusion,that the study of letters was unsu i t e d to ladies ofamiddling station,and should be reserved for princesses. [63]

 

http://switzerland.isyours.com/r/znamenitosti/bios/224.html

Man of letters and man of war, Agrippa dAubigne was born intheareasurrounding Pons (Sai n t o nge) in 1552. At first, companion ofHenryIV,he retreated after the abdication of th e k i n g and, from 1550to1601,wrote his Universal History, devoted to the French reform part y .T hework brought him exile and in 1620 he sought refuge in Geneva ,wherehehad already l i v e d as a student. To be precise, he chose to liveinJussy</e/guide/geneva/around.html>, w h e r e he had built what isnowknown asthe Chateau du Crest

Agrippa dAubigne worked to provide the city of Calvinwithnewfortifications (Saint-Je a n a n d Saint-Victor) and to bringtogethertheSwiss towns into a federation of protestant po w ers .

At the end of his life, the author of Les Tragiques was toregrettherecantation of hi s s o n , Constant, who would laterfatherFrancoisedAubigne, the future Madame de Maintenon.

It is ironic that the grand-daughter of the Calvinist writermarriedLouisXIV, who woul d r e v oke the Edict of Nantes which guaranteedfreedomofbelief to the Huguenots and which hi s g r a ndfather Henry IVhadgrantedthem largely due to pressure from Agrippa dAubigne.

b UNHCR </redirect.asp?target=http://www.unhcr-50.org/>

 

CHAPTER XLII.

Madame de Montespan's Father-confessor.He Alters HisOpinion.MadamedeMaintenon Is Consul t e d .A General on Theology.A CountryPriest.TheMarquise Postpones Her Repentance and Her A b sol u tion.

My father-confessor, who since my arrival at Court had nevervexedorthwarted me, sudde n l y a ltered his whole manner towards me, fromwhichIreadily concluded that the Queen ha d g o t hol d of him. Thispriest,ofgentle, easy-going, kindly nature, never spoke to me exce p t i na to neofdiscontent and reproach. He sought to induce me to leave theKingthereand th e n , and r etire to some remote chateau. Seeing thathewasintriguing, and had, so to speak, t a k en up h is position, likeawoman ofexperience I took up mine as well, and politely dismis s e d him,at whichhe was somewhat surprised. In matters of religion, MadamedeMaintenon,wh o u n derstan ds such things, was my usual mentor. I toldherthat I wasdisheartened, and shoul d n o t go t o confession again foreverso long.She was shocked at my resolve, and strove al l s h e coul d tomakemechange my mind and endeavour to lead me back into the right way.

She forever kept repeating her favourite argument, saying,"Goodgracious!suppose you sh o u l d die in that state!"

I replied that it was not my fault, as I had never ceased toobeytheprecepts of the Ho l y C h urch. "It was my old father-confessor,"saidI,"the Canon of Saint Thomas du Louvre, w h o h a d harshly refusedtoconfessme."

"What he does," replied she, "is solely for your own good."

"But if he has only my well-being in view," I quickly retorted,"whydidnot he think o f t h i s at first? It would have been far bettertohavestopped me at the outset, instead of l ett i n g me calmly proceeduponmycareer. He is obeying the Queen's orders, or else those of t h a tAbbeBossuet de Mauleon, who no longer dares attack me to my face."

As we thus talked, the Duc de Vivonne came into my room. Learningthetopicof our discuss i o n , he spoke as follows: "I should not begeneralof theKing's Galleys and a soldier at h e a r t and by professionif myopinion inthis matter were other than it is. I have attentive l y r eadcontroversieson this point, and have seen it conclusively provedthatour kings neve r ke p t a confessor at Court. Among these kings, too,therewere most holy,most saintly peopl e , a n d"

"Then, what do you conclude from that, Duke?" asked Madame de Maintenon.

"Why, that Madame will do well to respect his Majesty the Kingasherfather-confessor."

"Oh, Duke, you shock me! What dreadful advice, to be sure!"criedthegoverness.

"I have not the least wish to shock you, madame; but myvenerationforD'Aubigne

[Theodore Agrippa, Baron d'Aubigne, lieutenant-general in the army

of Henri IV. He persevered in Calvinism after the recantation of

the King.EDITOR'S NOTE.]

your illustrious grandfatheris too great to let me think that heisamongthe damned , a n d h e never attended confession at all."

"Eternity hides that secret from us," replied Madame deMaintenon."Eachday I pray t o G o d t o have mercy upon my poorgrandfather; if Ithoughthe were among the saved, I shoul d nev e r b e atpains to do this."

"Bah, madame! let's talk like sensible, straightforward people,"quoththeGeneral. "The r e v e rend Pere de la Chaiseone of the Jesuitoraclesgivesthe King absolution every year , a n d a uthorises him toreceive theHolySacrament at Easter. If the King's confessorthoroug h pr ies t asheispardons his intimacy with madame, here, how comes it thattheothercleric wo n ' t t olerate madame's intimacy with the King? On apointofsuch importance as this, the tw o c o nfe ssors ought really tocome tosomeagreement, or else, as the Jesuits have such a trem end o usreputation,the Marquise is entitled to side with them."

Hemmed in thus, Madame de Maintenon remarked "that the moralsofJesuitsand lax casuis t s h a d never been hers," and she advised metochoose aconfessor far removed from the Cour t a n d i ts intrigues.

The next day she mentioned a certain village priest to me,uninfluencedbyanybody, and w h o s e primitive simplicity caused him to belooked uponasa saint.

I submitted, and ingenuously went to confess myself to thiswonderfulman;his great good n e s s did not prevent him from rallying meabouttheelegance of my costume, and the perfu m e o f m y gloves, and myhair.Heinsisted upon knowing my name, and on learning it, flew in t o a passion.I suppress the details of his disagreeable propositions.Seatedsidewaysin his c o nfes si onal, he stamped on the floor, abused me,andspokedisrespectfully of the King. I cou l d n o t stand suchscandalousbehaviourfor long; and, wearing my veil down, I got into mycoa c h , beingthoroughly determined that I would take a good longholiday. M.deVivonne soundly r a t e d me for such cowardice, as he calledit,whileMadame de Maintenon offered me her curate- i n - chief, or elsetheAbbeGobelin.

But, for the time being, I determined to keep to my plan of notgoingtoconfession, stren g t h ened in such resolve by my brotherVivonne'sgoodsense, and the attitude of the King's Je s u i t confessor,who had agreatreputation and knew what he was about.

The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, V3

Madame La Marquise De Montespanhttp://www.blackmask.com/books34c/cm12b.htm

Scott, Sarah (Robinson), Mrs. The Life ofTheodoreAgrippad'Aubigne.London: E. and C. Di l l y , 1772.DC/112/A8/S4/1772

Works by Women and Anonymous Writers from 1770-1830 in theDepartmentofSpecial Collecti o n s ,VanPelt-DietrichLibrary<http://www.library.upenn.edu>,University ofPennsylvania

Chronological Listing

 

 

Child of THEODORE D'AUBIGNE and SUZANNE DE LUSIGNON is:

12. i. CONSTANT12 D'AUBIGNE, b. 1584, Pons, Saintogne, France; d. WFT Est. 1614-1675, France.

 

Generation No. 12

12. CONSTANT12 D'AUBIGNE (THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1)7 was born 1584 in Pons, Saintogne, France8, and died WFT Est. 1614-1675 in France9. He married (1) JEANNE CARDILLAC. He married (2) ANN MARCHANT WIDOW OF MONCRIEF10 October 07, 1608 in La Rochelle, France11.

Notes for CONSTANT D'AUBIGNE:

persecuted for his Huguenot sympathies.

When Constant came out of prison, sure of getting the post ofGovernorforLa Martiniq u e , h e brings there all his family. Alas, thejob isalreadytaken. After two years he aband o n s th em and goes to LaRochelle.Thefamily spent some years in Martinique, but when they h e a r ofConstant'sdeath, Francoise and her Mother returned to France.

 

 

Notes for JEANNE CARDILLAC:

The Marchioness of Maintenon, la marquise de Maintenon,neeFrancoised'Aubigne, was b o r n i n the prison of Niort on November241635. To allintent, she was an orphan. Her fathe r w a s Constantd'Aubigne,seigneurd'Aubigny et de Surimeau. Her Mother was JeannedeCardilha c . S h e hadchosen to stay with her husband in prison.Constantwas in prison forcounterfitti n g , b ut he was also a murderer.BeforeFrancoise, Constantand Jeanne had two sons: Constan t , b or n in1628,died accidently in1646. Charles, born in 1634, died in 1703

 

Notes for ANN MARCHANT WIDOW OF MONCRIEF:

Sketch of the Dabneys of Virginia

 

Children of CONSTANT D'AUBIGNE and JEANNE CARDILLAC are:

i. FRANCOIS D'AUBIGNE (MADAME13 DE MAINTENON), m. (1) LOUIS XIV; m. (2) PAUL SCARRON.

Notes for FRANCOIS D'AUBIGNE (MADAME DE MAINTENON):

1 AUTH Huguenot converted to Catholicism

She would create a very fashionableschool for girls at St.Cyr.MadamedeMaintenon is memo r a b le as an educator and was responsiblefortheimprovement of the moral tones of the Cour t . Th eMarchionessofMaintenon, la marquise de Maintenon, nee Francoised'Aubigne, was born i n th e prison of Niort on November 24 1635. To allintent, she wasanorphan. Her father w a s C onst ant d'Aubigne,seigneurd'Aubigny etdeSurimeau. Her Mother was Jeanne de Cardilhac . S h e ha dchosen tostaywith her husband in prison. Constant was in prisonforcounterfitting , b ut h e was also a murderer. Before Francoise,Constantand Jeanne had twosons: Constant, b o r n i n 1628, diedaccidently in1646. Charles, born in1634, died in 1703

Francoise's Grand-Father was Theodore Agrippa d'Aubigne(1552-1630),asoldier, histori a n a n d poet, Calvinistic, whose life,filledwithdangers and adventures in the Huguenot cau s e un d er Henri IV,endedinexile at Geneva and died a hero. He is remembered for his Histoir e Universelle and Histoire Secrete who were officially burned and healsowroteLes Aventure s d u b a ron de Foeneste and Les Tragiques,poemessatiriques

Her Father was persecuted for his Huguenot sympathies. In spiteofherProtestant herita g e s h e was baptized a Catholic.

When Constant came out of prison, sure of getting the post ofGovernorforLa Martiniq u e , h e brings there all his family. Alas, thejob isalreadytaken. After two years he aband o n s th em and goes to LaRochelle.Thefamily spent some years in Martinique, but when they h e a r ofConstant'sdeath, Francoise and her Mother returned to France. Theylivedthere ingr e a t po verty. At twelve, the girl and her two brotherswereeducated bya Protestant aunt, b u t t he M other of her GodMother,Madamede Neuillant,gets special permission from the Queen A n n e d'Autriche tokidnap thechild from this Calvinistic (Huguenot) home. At thatpoint,Franc o i se i sused as a servant, herding the turkeys. Eventuallyshe istaken to theUrsulines Conv e n t i n Niort, until sixteen, but shestillhas not reallyadopted the Catholic faith so s h e i s pu t inanotherconvent, in Paris,where she decides to convert to get her freedomandbe c ome s v ery devout.

She is still 16 years old when her Godmother decides to marryherandchoses a man 25 ye a r s o lder, with serious rhumatism.

He is a poet, Paul SCARRON 1610-1660, a French RealisticNovelistandburlesque playwrig h t r e membered for Roman comique.HisNouvellesmagi-comiques supplied Moliere, Beaumarchais a n d S edainewithcharacters, plots, and titles.

He holds a "salon" in their home. There we can see:Benserade,Marigny,Mortemart, Villarc e a u x,la marquise de Sbbvignbb.

Through his position she became a figure in the literaryandintellectualworld of Paris , b e i ng a fine writer herself.In 1660 hediedleaving herwith some debts and again she fou n d h e rself penniless,buttheQueen-Mother continued to his widow the poet's pension. Late r M m edeMontespan official mistress of the King at the time, obtainedapensionfor her.

In 1669 starts a real saga: Mme de Montespan is pregnant withherfirstchild from the K i n g , Louis XIV dit le Roi Soleil (the SunKing).Mme deMaintenon is hired to secretly con c e a l this first child,waitingat thebirthing, then hiding the child in small house in Par i s , so thattheMarquis de Montespan is unable to have the child to legitimizehim.Whenthe s e c on d child arrives, the same thing is requiredfromFrancoise, buthe is kept in another ho u s e , out of Paris. Whenagain Mmede Montespanis with child, the King decides to install t h e g overness(Mme deMaintenon) and all his bastards (6) at Vaugirard. In 1673,whenthe Queen d i e d, the King legitimized his children from MadamedeMontespan andFrancoise was abl e t o g o t o the Chateau de Versailles.

Mme de Montespan had been the lady-in-waiting fortheQueenMaria-Theresaand after sh e w a s g ranted a divorce fromherex-husband,the Marquis de Montespan, she became the Officia l M i stressof theKing.She was eventually supplanted by Mlle deFontange.TheQueen,Marie-The re se , wa s devoted to Mme de Maintenon anddied in herarms. Itwas in 1684, King Louis XIV, h av in g ha d greatesteem for MmedeMaintenon, secretly married her. Because of her highstanda rd s , i tisunlikely that Mme de Maintenon had been his mistress,though itispossible. She r emai n e d with him until his death in 1715.She wasjudgedharshly by the Ministers of the Kin g bec a u se of her"undue"influence onthe King on matters of State, mostly religioustoleranc e fo r t he manyProtestants still living in France since Henri IV.

She had Mme de Guyon released after 7 years inprison(house-arrest)becauseof her Quiet i s t t eachings which hadbeendisturbing to the Pope.She hadfounded a famous school for theem p over iched noble-born girls, St-Cyr,which provided them withanopportunity to get the educ a t io n expectedwhen they would marry attheirlevel or beyond, and when the King died, and c a m e into power,sheretired in St.Cyr

 

 

ii. CHARLES D'AUBINE.

Child of CONSTANT D'AUBIGNE and ANN MARCHANT is:

13. iii. THEODORE AGRIPPA13 D'AUBIGNE, b. Abt. 1610, Rochelle, CharenteMaritime, France.

 

Generation No. 13

13. THEODORE AGRIPPA13 D'AUBIGNE (CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1)12,13 was born Abt. 1610 in Rochelle, CharenteMaritime, France14.15

 

Children of THEODORE AGRIPPA D'AUBIGNE are:

14. i. JOHN14 D'AUBIGNE, b. Abt. 1640, France; d. Aft. 1685, Wales.

15. ii. CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE, b. 1640, Martinique .France; d. Abt. 1710, Hanover County, VA.

 

Generation No. 14

14. JOHN14 D'AUBIGNE (THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born Abt. 1640 in France16, and died Aft. 1685 in Wales17.

 

Children of JOHN D'AUBIGNE are:

i. ROBERT15 D'AUBIGNE, d. Boston, Massachusettes.

Notes for ROBERT D'AUBIGNE:

The d'Aubigne Line

From Robert d'Aubigne (Dabney) of Boston, sprang the menwhoforthreegenerations, and al m o s t from the beginning of ourrepublic,heldtheUnited States consulates in the Azores or We s t e rnIslands.Duringthisperiod the government saw many changes, but only oneattemptwas m a d eduring eighty years to take the consulship out of thehandsofRobertd'Aubigne. They bo r e t h emselves so well in their officeas towintheconfidence of Whig, Democrat, and Republic a n.

 

 

16. ii. JOHN D'AUBIGNE, b. Abt. 1680, France; d. WFT Est. 1711-1770, Pamunky River in Virginia.

17. iii. CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE, b. Abt. 1681, France; d. WFT Est. 1725-1773, Virginia.

15. CORNELIUS14 D'AUBIGNE (THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1)18,19 was born 1640 in Martinique .France, and died Abt. 1710 in Hanover County, VA. He married SUSANNE SWAN20 1668.

Notes for CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE:

http://www.earlyfamilies.com/Pages/mullins-family-in-europe.html

After studying the route of individual Colonial VirginiaHuguenotfamiliesfrom their dia r i e s and family and church records, Ihave toadmit thepossiblity that several of our des Mo u l i ns relativesleftFrance by thelate 1500s or very early 1600s, making their way acrosst h e b order intoGermany (probably Mannheim, which was a city of refugeforHuguenots, andwho s e c h urch had a reader named duMoulin in thattimeframe), down theRhine to Amsterdam and ac r o s s the channel toEngland.There, possibly inthe Threadneedle Street Huguenot Church, th e Mu l linsfamily came incontact with Cornelius d'Aubigne (Dabney) and werebroughtto Virgi n i a by him and by other transporter-planters ofVirginia. Atleast two Mullinsmen are mentio n e d i n connection withd'Aubigne, thisearly planter ofrecognized French Huguenot origin : ( 1 )Joh n Mullins,who was transportedby d'Aubigne (Dabney) in 1666, and (2)MatthewMullins , w h o wa s settledon "Indian lands" in Pamunkey Neck,Virginia in1699 -- lands under thecont r o l o f Cornelius d'Aubigne, whowas chargedwith handling Indianaffairs for the Crown of Eng l a nd . I donot knowwhether there is aconnection between John and Matthew, but thisfamilyhi s t o ry postulatesthat Matthew is our first recognizableanddocumentable (albeit withcircums t a n tial evidence) direct-lineancestorin Virginia. I admit herethat it is possible that Mat t h e w ofPamunkeyNeck "settled on Indianlands" came on the third Huguenot ship,whosepasse n g e r list is lost,but of whom it is said that many of themsettledsomewhere outside theMan a k i n township which had been reservedfor theFrench refugees. (SeeNell Marion Nugent's Cava l i e rs andPioneers, allthree volumes, as thesource of the information on John andMatthew M u l lins and CorneliusDabney; the Parish and Probate Records ofthe Shires ofEngland -- availa b l e through membership in ancestry.com --as sourcesfor Mullins andDabney families in Engl a n d .)

The cause of these long and hazardous journeys through areasravagedbycivil war and pl a g u e only to embark on a transatlanticsailing shiptogo to the Colonies in the wilderne s s w a s the searchforreligiousfreedom. Let us take a look at the region of France from whic h ou r desMoulins direct-line ancestors possibly came.

In 1569, a while after Calvin had fled to Geneva and a few yearsbeforetheSaint Bartholo m e w 's Day Massacre of the ProtestantsinParis,Protestants occupied half the area of Viver a i s i n Ardeche. Itisperhapssignificant that this area is located on the route of Marguer i teo fNavarre -- the Protectress of Protestants -- when she traveledfromhercourt in Nera c , t hr ough the great learning center atMontpellier,and onnorthward to Lyon. After 1572 bro u gh t t he massacrein Paris, thewholeregion was enveloped in war, plague and famine. With on l y bri efepisodesof cease-fire, not really peace, the violent protestsof thedissentersf r o m th e established church and the resultingharshsuppression by theestablishment continu e d u nti l at least 1709,when aMathieu de Moulinwas executed as a Camisard (a violent Protes t an tmovement) inVilleneuve, Viverais in the Ardeche.

2. Another possibility regarding the relationship of these twomen--Cornelius Dabney a n d J o hn Mullins -- is that two oftheprominentpreachers/teachers of the Reformation being T h eod o reAgrippad'Aubigneand Pierre du Moulin, both having connections to thecenters ofProt e st ant learning and to many of the Protestant churches,the two mentookrefuge in Englan d i n t h e late 1500s or early 1600s.Each of thefamiliescould have produced men of a later g ene rat i on whocame toVirginia.

 

 

Children of CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE and SUSANNE SWAN are:

18. i. GEORGE15 DABNEY, b. 1676, King William, Virginia; d. Bef. April 11, 1734, King William, Va.

ii. CORNELIUS DABNEY, b. 1686, Hanover, Virginia; d. 1764-1765, Hanover, Virginia.

 

Generation No. 15

16. JOHN15 D'AUBIGNE (JOHN14, THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born Abt. 1680 in France21, and died WFT Est. 1711-1770 in Pamunky River in Virginia22.

Notes for JOHN D'AUBIGNE:

The D'Aubigne Line

John d"Aubigne (Dabney) established himself on the lowerPamunkyRiveratwhat has been k n o w n ever since as Dabney's Ferry, andthisbecametheoriginal seat of the Dabneys of King Wi l l i am andGlouceterCountiesofVirginika. John was married twice. MOst of thefamilies ofL o w erVirginia are descended from John d'Aubigne. One of thecountryseatsofthis family of Da b n e y was situated on the Pamunky River,in thecountyofKing and Queen, Virginia, and was ca l l e d Bellevue.

 

 

Child of JOHN D'AUBIGNE is:

19. i. MARY16 D'AUBIGNE, b. WFT Est. 1701-1730, Virginia; d. WFT Est. 1732-1812, Virginia.

17. CORNELIUS15 D'AUBIGNE (JOHN14, THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born Abt. 1681 in France23, and died WFT Est. 1725-1773 in Virginia24. He married (1) EDITH. He married (2) SARAH JENNINGS WFT Est. 1712-1746 in Virginia25,26.

Notes for CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE:

The d'Aubigne Line

Cornelius settled on the northern side of the Pamunky River andJohnonthesouthern side.

 

 

Child of CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE and EDITH is:

i. GEORGE16 D'AUBIGNE.

Child of CORNELIUS D'AUBIGNE and SARAH JENNINGS is:

20. ii. CORNELIUS16 DABNEY, b. Hanover County, Virginia.

18. GEORGE15 DABNEY (CORNELIUS14 D'AUBIGNE, THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1)27 was born 1676 in King William, Virginia, and died Bef. April 11, 1734 in King William, Va. He married ELIZABETH ANDERSON28.

 

Children of GEORGE DABNEY and ELIZABETH ANDERSON are:

21. i. MARY16 DABNEY, b. 1702, Virginia.

ii. GEORGE DABNEY, b. Abt. 1704, <, , Va>.

iii. WILLIAM DABNEY, b. Abt. 1706, Of, Hanover, Va.

iv. SARAH DABNEY, b. Abt. 1708, Of, King William, Va.

v. JUDITH DABNEY, b. Abt. 1710, Of, King William, Va.

 

Generation No. 16

19. MARY16 D'AUBIGNE (JOHN15, JOHN14, THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born WFT Est. 1701-1730 in Virginia29, and died WFT Est. 1732-1812 in Virginia30. She married ISAAC WINSTON WFT Est. 1732-1767 in Virginia31.

 

Child of MARY D'AUBIGNE and ISAAC WINSTON is:

i. SARAH17 D'AUBIGNE, b. WFT Est. 1694-1717, Virginia32; d. WFT Est. 1739-1805, Virginia33; m. (1) JOHN SYME , SR., WFT Est. 1726-1730, Virginia34; m. (2) JOHN HENRY , COL., WFT Est. 1726-1758, Virginia35.

20. CORNELIUS16 DABNEY (CORNELIUS15 D'AUBIGNE, JOHN14, THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1) was born in Hanover County, Virginia.

 

Child of CORNELIUS DABNEY is:

i. JOHN17 DABNEY, m. ANN HARRIS.

21. MARY16 DABNEY (GEORGE15, CORNELIUS14 D'AUBIGNE, THEODORE AGRIPPA13, CONSTANT12, THEODORE AGRIPPA11, JEAN10, PIERRE9, THEBART8, MERLET7, PIERRE6, SUVORY "GAVARY"5, GUILLAUME "D'RILLAU"4, D'AIMERY3, JEAN OLIVIER CHEVALIER2, GEOFFREY SIR1)36 was born 1702 in Virginia. She married (1) STEPHEN PETTUS37. She married (2) STEPHEN PETTUS, son of THOMAS PETTUS and MARY DABNEY.

 

Notes for STEPHEN PETTUS:

Dabney-Pettuses by Mrs. P. Stacy, Va. Genealogical Hist., p. 849

Stephen Pettus (Thomas, Thomas) called himself "StephenPettusofHanover"in deeds to hi s s o n s in 1745 and 1754. In 1700 hewas"ofBlisslandParish, New Kent" when he signed a "lea se- r e lease"deedfor"Littleton"and "Utopia" in favor of his stepmother's 2ndhusband,JamesB r a y . Thisdeed is something of a mystery, quite lengthybutnotcomplete. The"release" w a s n o t within it when found and we donotknowwhat price Mr.Bray paid. How it was found a n d a f u ll copy isgiveninVa. Hist. Mag.,xivi 5. It was signed also by Elizabeth andJaneFr e eman a nd theirhusbands. If Mr. Bray was safeguarding hiswife'stitle toproperty lefthe r b y Cap t . Pettus, why did not othercousinssign?

Blissland Parish was in lower New Kent, adjoiningKingWilliam.Dabneyslived in New Ke n t a n d King William. StephenmarriedMary,daughter ofCapt. George Dabney of King William . H i s w ill,1729,namesdaughter MaryPettus, and grandson Dabney Pettus, son ofStephenPettus . " I n 1720Hanover was set off from New Kent. In1727StephenPettuspatentedextensively in wes t e r n Hanover. Louisa setoff fromHanover in1742,included part of his holdings. He deede d L o uisa landsto sons,Dabney,John and George. To son, Stephen he deeded orwilledHanoverla n d s .Hanover records were burned in 1865. He seems to have had a daughter who married Ter r y . I n 1761 John Pettus deeded "forlove"toGeorge Terry,had on his bond Dabney Pettus, s o n o f St ephen.But this was down in Charlotte Co. Stephen Pettus , of Hanover's sons,alllef t Ha nov er and Louisa. And, oddly, as they went elsewhere,OvertonPettusesmoved intoHanove r a n d Lou isa, and are known as the Pettuses of Louisa. George Pettus (Ste. Tho. Tho) was probably the youngest of the brothers.He may have gone to Jefferson Co., which became the stat e o K engucky.There in1792 a Stephen Pettus married Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Adams.

 

Children of MARY DABNEY and STEPHEN PETTUS are:

i. STEPHEN17 PETTUS, b. Abt. 1726, <Of, Hanover, Va>.

ii. DABNEY PETTUS, b. Abt. 1730, <Of, Hanover, Va>.

iii. GEORGE PETTUS, b. Abt. 1732, <Of, Hanover, Va>.

iv. THOMAS PETTUS, b. Abt. 1734, <Of, Hanover, Va>.

v. PETTUS, b. Abt. 1736, Of, Hanover, Va.

Children of MARY DABNEY and STEPHEN PETTUS are:

vi. STEPHEN17 PETTUS, b. 1726.

vii. JOHN PETTUS, b. 1728, Virginia; d. 1781, Lunenberg County, Virginia; m. (1) SARAH; m. (2) MARY MINOR, 1751.

Notes for JOHN PETTUS:

Dabney Pettuses by P. Stacy, p. 857.

John Pettus (D., T., T.) called himself John Pettus sr. of Lunenburg in his will, dated J u n e , 1781, and proved in October. NamedwifeSarah;son, John; daughters Elizabeth Ragland , M a r y Palmer, Sarah, and Susanna. His wife's will, 1798, named son, John, and daughters, Eliz ab ethRagland,Mary Palmer and Sarah Pettus. Named sons-in-law,JohnRagland,Karm (orKarom Ba y n e , and John Pettus, now the husband ofmydaughter,Sarah." andnamed granddaughter, Fanny B a y n e.EvidentlySusannah hadmarried anddied. Marriage bonds say Fanny Baynemarried,18 0 4 , J ohnSmithson. Andmarriage bonds says Sarah Pettusmarried, 1785,JohnPettus, with JohnP e t tu s, surety. The surety, ofcourse wasSarah'sbrother. The groomwas either their first c o u si n, sonof Thomas,of NewKent and Amelia, or"John Pettus of St. Martin's, Louisa:(S. , T . ,T. )who had come toCharlotte about 1764.

Dear Mr. Ramsey,Thanks for the additional information in yourlastmessage.In the second ge n e ration of your pedigree, you have MaryPettuswhomarried Chilian Palmer as the daught e r o f J ohn Pettus(1720-1770)andthe husband of Sarah, d. 1797. Based upon my research int o theor ig inalrecords, I have reached some different conclusions abouttheidentity ofyou r Jo hn Pet tu s.John's will was proved in 1781 inLunenburgCounty,Virginia--not 1770. Sara h's wil l wa s pr oved in 1797inLunenburg, whichagrees with your pedigree list. John's wil lmentionsh is d aug hter MaryPalmer, and Sarah's will mentions Chilian Palmer.Perhaps you h ad in mind Joh n P ett us of Louisa County, Virginia,who diedtestate in 1770, butJohn's wil l mentions his d aug hte r MaryWatersPettus. She later marriedCharles Blunt or Blount.Do y ou have anyrecordo f yo u r John's birth, oris 1720 an estimate on your part?YourJohn Pettus was the son of Step he nP ettus of Hanover County, Virginia,and hiswife Mary [?] Dabney . Thisstatement is well-s u ppo rted byoriginalrecords that are still extant. Iam includin g a thoroughanalysis of thee v id ence in my forthcomingbook.The identity of StephenPettu s is stillsomething of a puzzl e ; however, I believe that he wasone of the grantorsin th e sale of the Pettusestates in Ja m es C ityCounty and New KentCounty in 1700. Stephen als ohad a son Dabney, namedfor Stephen' s fat her-in-law, Capt. George Dabneyof King William C ounty,Virginia. Sofar as I am aware, S t eph en's sonwas the first Dabney Pettuson recor din Virginia.I offer these findingsin th e h op e that they willshed newlight on the subj ect of your initialquery.Yours truly,William W . P ettusIV

 

 

viii. DABNEY PETTUS, b. 1730.

ix. GEORGE PETTUS, b. 1732.

x. THOMAS PETTUS, b. 1734.










 

 

Copyright 1996  These are my own working genealogy files that I share with you.  The errors are my own.  But, perhaps they will give you a starting point.  All original writing is copyrighted.  Webmaster

Copyright 1996  These are my own working genealogy files that I share with you.  The errors are my own.  But, perhaps they will give you a starting point.  All original writing is copyrighted.  Webmaster

Copyright 1996  These are my own working genealogy files that I share with you.  The errors are my own.  But, perhaps they will give you a starting point.  All original writing is copyrighted.  Webmaster